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The purpose of the Seattle University Project on Family Homelessness is to engage the public in ending family homelessness.  Most people know us because of the Journalism Fellowships on Family Homelessness, which was our first initiative four years ago.

We’ve been up to a lot since then.

Want to learn more? Visit About Us, or link to our blog here to see our most up-to-date news. Or, like us on Facebook.

Our biggest projects this summer of 2014 are the StoryCorps “Finding our Way” project and supporting the work of our sister project, Film & Family Homelessness.

We hope you’ll find some fresh ideas for how you can work with us to make homelessness among families rare, brief and not repeated.

Thank you for visiting us.

Recent Posts

Homelessness and Poverty in the Public Education System: An Intro to Our Blog Series

This is a re-post from our partner, Firesteel, from Sept. 2, 2014.  This week, Firesteel began publishing an insightful seven-part series on homelessness in the classroom, written by our project coordinator, Perry Firth. Homelessness affects more than 30,000 school-age children in Washington state.
The series also includes brand-new infographics, designed by our digital design assistant, Krista Kent (see below). Read and share!

Children know when they are falling behind academically. As they continue to struggle, they can develop both low self esteem and a dislike of school. That is why it is so essential that children who need extra help get it.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
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Children know when they are falling behind academically. As they continue to struggle, they can develop both low self esteem and a dislike of school. That is why it is so essential that children who need extra help get it. Image from pixabay.com.

As the new school year starts, teachers face many challenges. So do children who are dealing with homelessness and poverty. And this couldn’t be truer than for impoverished children who are also in need of special education services. With parents focusing on day-to-day survival and too busy to consistently advocate for their needs, children who are homeless may fail to receive the services they need to succeed in school.

The result is that children already harmed by their living circumstances can fall even further behind. Therefore, adults who work with children in poverty and homelessness need to understand how this environment influences academic skill and emotional development, and how it relates to special education needs.

So, we present this seven-part series on how homelessness and poverty affect the development of children, and how this can show up in the education system. Thanks to Perry Firth for contributing this important series.

Read the full post here and follow the seven-part series on Firesteel.

Also, check out these new infographics created for the series by our digital design assistant, Krista Kent. Here are the first four:

intro infographicpost 1 infographic

post 2 infographic

post 3 infographic

Watch for more the week of Sept. 8, 2014 on Firesteel.

  1. As Heard on NPR: Homelessness Threatens Student Success Leave a reply
  2. StoryCorps Finding Our Way — Recordings Bring Laughter, Tears and Inspiration in Snohomish County Leave a reply
  3. A Local Perspective on the 2014 National Conference on Homelessness Leave a reply
  4. The Smiths — The Film About Homelessness That Had To Be Made 1 Reply
  5. The Beast Inside — A Story of Relentless Positivity 2 Replies
  6. StoryCorps Finding Our Way — Tacoma stories painful, uplifting, sincere Leave a reply
  7. “Super Dads”: Stories of Resilience from Children and Fathers Faced with Homelessness 3 Replies
  8. “Home for Sale”: Nowhere to Call Home 4 Replies
  9. Project Cool: Supplying a Brighter Future for Children who are Homeless 2 Replies
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